In its simplest form a dock leveler is an adjustable ramp that provides lift truck access from the warehouse floor to the truck bed. Dock leveler deck cant allows the dock leveler deck and lip assembly to flex up to 4” laterally or from side-to- side. Typically incoming truck beds are pretty much level from side-to-side with the warehouse floor. However if there is an uneven build-up of snow, ice or debris outside the building the incoming truck bed can be parked on an angle with one corner of ... Read More
On an electro-hydraulic lift table the lift motor is mechanically coupled to the hydraulic pump. When the lift motor is activated the hydraulic system pumps the hydraulic oil to the lift cylinders and the lift table rises. When the lift motor is shut off by there is a slight overrun “freewheel” effect, the pump continues to pump oil for a split second and the lift table rises slightly. If precise positioning is required a Sure Stop Valve is added to the hydraulic circuit. At rest the Sure Stop Valve is normally close... Read More
Yes you can. With the dock lift in the lowered position there is no issue. However if the dock lift is to be loaded or unloaded from the side in the raised position the dock lift capacity rating must be carefully selected to avoid platform deflection and premature wear. Dock lifts are generally loaded and unloaded from the ends. The weight moves on and off the dock lift platform travelling with the length of the scissor legs. When dock lifts are loaded and unloaded from the side the weight travels across the width of the scissor legs. Travelling across ... Read More
Most lift table manufacturers recommend a maximum hydraulic hose length for remote/external power units that should not be exceeded for satisfactory performance.  The issue is not raising the lift table; a pressurized hydraulic hose of almost any practical length will raise the lift table, the issue is lowering the lift table. If the lift table is lowered with weight on the platform the weight will assist in pushing the hydraulic oil back through the hydraulic hose to the reservoir. If the lift table is lowere... Read More
Conventional hydraulic dock levelers are powered up and the hydraulic lip extends, when the push button is released it is gravity down until the extended lip rests on the truck bed ready for use. During loading/unloading it is common for the truck bed to move up and down this is referred to as “float”. Vertical storing dock levelers are powered up and powered down. On the downward travel ... Read More
The most significant benefit of converting a mechanical dock leveler to hydraulic is the safety and ease of single push button operation at the loading dock area. Converting to hydraulic eliminates the need to repetitively bend and pull the release chain and then walk the dock leveler downward into position on the truck. When successfully converted to hydraulic operation it’s now as easy as pushing a button. Any b... Read More
The overall lifting capacity is the most common and most referred to rating on a lift table. The overall rating is based on an evenly distributed load and these ratings typically range from 500 lbs to 20,000 lbs. Lift tables that are used to accommodate a rolling load such as a pallet truck or rolls of paper, coils of steel etc. have 2 additional capacity ratings; single axle end load and single axle side load ratings. The end and side load capacity ratings only apply when the lift tabl... Read More
Although it is not very common you can use a lift truck on a dock lift if the dock lift is properly sized, rated and equipped. Some of the factors to first consider. The dock lift platform size should accommodate the overall length of the lift truck with the longest load that the lift truck will be carrying. The width of the dock lift should be sized to allow the lift truck operator to exit the lift truck and move around freely on the platform. When selecting the dock lift capacity consider a combination of the overall weight of the empty lift truck plu... Read More
When a lift table lowers into a recessed pit there is often the challenge of addressing a potential pinch point. A lift table with straight 90 degree vertical toe guards on the platform sides can create a pinch point as the platform lowers into the pit. The two most common lift table options to minimize the risk of a pinch point as the platform lowers are tapered toe guards or electric toe sensors. Tapered toe guards a... Read More
Most lift tables are operated using a straight forward hydraulic design. An electric motor coupled to a hydraulic system pumps oil into the lift cylinder(s) which in turn raises the lift table. When the lift table is in the correct position the operator releases the up button and the lift table stops moving. In this elevated position the hydraulic oil is “locked” in the lift cylinder(s). In the event of a hydraulic hose rupture or fitting failure the lift table would drop quickly and at an uncontroll... Read More