Yes multiple lift tables can be ordered with synchronized operation. The question to first address is what level of synchronization is actually required and is the weight of the load on each lift table the same?  Basic synchronization can often be accomplished through the use of a geared hydraulic flow divider. This system provides fairly consistent accuracy and repeatability however there may be some minor height variations during the operating cycle. With this design when all of the lift tabl... Read More
ProSeries remote power units are generally installed right on the floor within close proximity of the lift table. Remote power units are supplied with 10’ of hydraulic hose as standard however longer hydraulic hose lengths are available; depending on the model up to 35’ of hydraulic hose can be ordered. An optional wall mounting bracket is available to install the power unit up off the floor and out of harm’s way. It is recommended to install this option with a minimum of 6’ of under cle... Read More
A power plug on a 10’ cord is an option that is available on many models however it is not a standard feature provided on every lift table. As standard all lift tables are supplied with temporary wiring at time of shipment and these are intended only to initially activate and raise the lift table, the technician then engages the maintenance stand or safely blocks the lift table in the raised position. The temporary wiring is then removed and the permanent wiring completed by a qualified electr... Read More
The main concern is operator safety as it relates to eliminating potential pinch/shear/crush points when the lift table platform and rotating top lowers into the pit. First the lift table is equipped with . Electric toes sensors are an interlocked 4 sided bar assembly that is suspended under the lower 4 sided edge of the lift table platform. When lowering if any obstruction (operator’s foot, debris etc.) contacts the suspended 4 sided perimeter bar the lowering stops immediately. Second the ro... Read More
On an electro-hydraulic lift table the lift motor is mechanically coupled to the hydraulic pump. When the lift motor is activated the hydraulic system pumps the hydraulic oil to the lift cylinders and the lift table rises. When the lift motor is shut off by there is a slight overrun “freewheel” effect, the pump continues to pump oil for a split second and the lift table rises slightly. If precise positioning is required a Sure Stop Valve is added to the hydraulic circuit. At rest the Sure St... Read More
Yes you can. With the dock lift in the lowered position there is no issue. However if the dock lift is to be loaded or unloaded from the side in the raised position the dock lift capacity rating must be carefully selected to avoid platform deflection and premature wear. Dock lifts are generally loaded and unloaded from the ends. The weight moves on and off the dock lift platform travelling with the length of the scissor legs. When dock lifts are loaded and unloaded from the side the weight trave... Read More
Most lift table manufacturers recommend a maximum hydraulic hose length for remote/external power units that should not be exceeded for satisfactory performance.  The issue is not raising the lift table; a pressurized hydraulic hose of almost any practical length will raise the lift table, the issue is lowering the lift table. If the lift table is lowered with weight on the platform the weight will assist in pushing the hydraulic oil back through the hydraulic hose to the reservoir. If the lift... Read More
Conventional hydraulic dock levelers are powered up and the hydraulic lip extends, when the push button is released it is gravity down until the extended lip rests on the truck bed ready for use. During loading/unloading it is common for the truck bed to move up and down this is referred to as “float”. Vertical storing dock levelers are powered up and powered down. On the downward travel approximately 24” above the finished floor level a limit switch activates and releases the controlled d... Read More
There is no definitive answer to that question but there are reasonable expectations. A lift table that is cycled up to 8 times per hour in a single 8 hour shift and a 5 day work week should last 20+ years if properly inspected and maintained. It is very important that lift tables be designed and equipped to suit the specific requirements of the application. For example a lift table operating in a wash down application or an outdoor application should have an upgraded finish coat such as epoxy p... Read More
The first step when considering converting to hydraulic operation is to investigate if the dock leveler is structurally sound. In its simplest form a dock leveler is a temporary structural bridge between the building floor and the truck to be loaded. A qualified loading dock service technician should first perform a complete front to back structural inspection of the dock levelers primary components. During the inspection the technician should check the deck, beam and headboard weldments, the li... Read More